Unique new photos of uncontacted Brazilian Indians

The photos reveal a thriving, healthy community with baskets full of manioc and papaya fresh from their gardens.
The photos reveal a thriving, healthy community with baskets full of manioc and papaya fresh from their gardens.
© G. Miranda/FUNAI/Survival

New photos obtained by Survival show uncontacted Indians in never-seen-before detail. The Indians are living in Brazil, near the Peruvian border, and are featured in the ‘Jungles’ episode of BBC1’s ‘Human Planet’ (Thurs 3 Feb, 8pm).

The pictures were taken by Brazil’s Indian Affairs Department, which has authorized Survival to use them as part of its campaign to protect their territory. They reveal a thriving, healthy community with baskets full of manioc and papaya fresh from their gardens. (For a detailed explanation of who the Indians are, and what the photos reveal, go to www.uncontactedtribes.org/brazilphotos)
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Survival has launched a new website on uncontacted tribes: www.uncontactedtribes.org

The tribe’s survival is in serious jeopardy as an influx of illegal loggers invades the Peru side of the border. Brazilian authorities believe the influx of loggers is pushing isolated Indians from Peru into Brazil, and the two groups are likely to come into conflict.


Survival and other NGOs have been campaigning for years for the Peruvian government to act decisively to stop the invasion, but little has been done.

Last year an American organization, Upper Amazon Conservancy, carried out the latest of several overflights on the Peru side, uncovering further evidence of illegal logging in a protected area.

Marcos Apurinã, Coordinator of Brazil’s Amazon Indian organization COIAB said today, ‘It is necessary to reaffirm that these peoples exist, so we support the use of images that prove these facts. These peoples have had their most fundamental rights, particularly their right to life, ignored … it is therefore crucial that we protect them.’

Renowned Brazilian Indian leader Davi Kopenawa Yanomami said today, ‘The place where the Indians live, fish, hunt and plant must be protected. That is why it is useful to show pictures of the uncontacted Indians, for the whole world to know that they are there in their forest and that the authorities must respect their right to live there.’

TV presenter Bruce Parry of hit TV series Tribe said, ‘Protecting the land where uncontacted tribes live is of global importance. We have consistently failed to introduce them to our world without inflicting terrible traumas. It is for them to decide when they want to join our world. Not us.’

Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘The illegal loggers will destroy this tribe. It’s vital that the Peruvian government stop them before time runs out’.

Note to Editors: These pictures can be reproduced provided the following link is included: www.uncontactedtribes.org/brazilphotos. Contact [email protected] for high-res versions.